About T-Mobile

About T-Mobile

Community & Sponsorships

Community & Sponsorships

With the introduction of JUMP!, T‑Mobile rewired the wireless industry and created the first no-hassle upgrade program. Whether we receive a device because our customers join JUMP! or JUMP! On Demand, participate in our Trade-In Program, or drop off their device in-store for recycling, we believe reuse is better and more eco-friendly than recycling. And our actions show it. We reuse or resell 86% of the devices we take back, with the rest being responsibly recycled by providers we have selected due to their leading industry environmental certification.1

Whether a handset or accessory we get back is reused or recycled, the high standards we set for our partners ensure responsible handling all the way through the lifecycle so our customers don't have to.

Take Action

Take Action

Have a device or accessory to trade-in or that's no longer needed? Looking to purchase a T-Mobile Certified Pre-Owned phone guaranteed to meet our picky standards? We are committed to providing the latest technology to our customers to fit their budget while protecting the planet.

 

Trade-In. T-Mobile's Trade-In program provides customers with the ability to trade existing mobile devices for money that could be used toward the purchase of a new handset.
Recycle In-Store. Through our handset recycling program you can take your cell phone (any make, model or carrier), cell phone batteries, chargers, accessories, tablets and netbooks to any T-Mobile location in the United States & Puerto Rico to be recycled for free. Find your closest T-Mobile retail store.
Buy Certified Pre-Owned. Getting a fully featured smartphone at an affordable price has never been this easy. Since 2013, T-Mobile has sold over 1.4 million cell phones refurbished to our high standards directly to our customers through our Certified Pre-Owned program. We know that the most eco-friendly device is the one that already exists.

Protect your information

Protect your information

Before bringing or sending in a device, make sure you:

  • Erase your address book, photos, messages and other stored information.
  • Disable the activation lock, anti-theft and/or find your phone settings.
  • Turn off power.
  • Remove the SIM card (found in some GSM or 4G devices). If you're unsure if your device has one, contact your provider for more information.
  • Restore the device factory settings on your device.
  • For instructions on how to do this, go to owner's manual or on the manufacturers' web site and follow the manufacturer's instructions for deleting all personal information on your wireless device.

Please note that if the device is not cleared of personal information our certified 3rd party electronics recycler has software that will automatically “wipe clean” all personal user content, which includes over 200 attributes, some of those are: Pictures, contacts, call history, e-mails, text messages, appointments, cookies and history, videos and tasks. However, T-Mobile and its recycler doesn't guarantee the security of confidential data stored in the electronic products you recycle.

Our standards

Our standards

T-Mobile handles various types of wireless phones, smartphones, accessories, and batteries. Federal and state laws regulate how batteries and devices are recycled. The T-Mobile recycling program complies with those laws and gives consumers a way to properly and safely recycle these items. T-Mobile requires suppliers and partners that repair and recycle these devices to be certified to the industry-leading R2 standard, which provides a common set or processes, safety measures and documentation requirements. R2 is rigorously and independently audited, emphasizing quality, safety, and transparency, including any devices exported for refurbishment and recycling. Recyclables include handsets, chargers, accessories, nickel cadmium (NiCd) batteries, lithium-ion batteries, small sealed lead acid (SSLA) batteries, and nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries.

Why this matters

Why this matters

The EPA estimates about 90 percent of cell phones end up in landfills or are disposed of improperly, posing potential harm to the environment.2 Because cell phones contain precious metals, recycling not only conserves these materials, but also helps prevent pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. For every one million cell phones we recycle, 35,284 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered.3 The EPA has more ways to be eco smart about your smart phone here.

Our approach

Our approach

As a values-driven company, we are committed to getting the right results, the right way. That's why we launched the recycling program for our customers in 2008, and why we continue to improve and optimize our supply chain. These efforts to better manage our handset lifecycle are a win-win for the planet and T-Mobile, resulting in over 9.5 million devices being reused or resold (and counting).

Partners and recognition

Partners and recognition

T-Mobile is a member of the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) and takes part in the Cellular Telecommunication and Internet Association (CTIA) Green Working Group, which includes efforts to encourage recycling of devices and accessories. We have won industry awards for our device reuse and recycling efforts, including:

  • Sustainability Award from the Institute for Supply Chain Management for creating new refurbished demand channels, increasing repair capacity and improving supplier management.
  • Green Award recipient from Supply & Demand Chain Executive Magazine for making green or sustainability a core part of our supply chain strategy and goals.
  • Supply Chain Distinction Award, in the Green Supply Chain category, from Supply Chain Logistics 2012 North America (WTG International) for producing return on investment through reduced energy and fuel consumption, water usage, waste output, and/or carbon footprint.

 

 

1. Call2Recycle: Responsible Recycle (R2) Electronics Repair and Recycling Environmental Certification (http://www.call2recycle.org/r2/)
2. U.S EPA. Electronics Waste Management in the United States: Approach 1. July 2007. EPA530R07009 (http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/materials/ecycling/manage.htm)
3. U.S Geological Survey: "Recycled Cell Phones – A Treasure Trove of Valuable Metals" (PDF) (July 2006)